Prepatellar bursitis steroid injection

If your doctor suspects that your housemaid's knee is caused by infection, they may draw some fluid from your knee, as described above. They can send this fluid off to the laboratory for tests. Whilst waiting for the results, they may prescribe some antibiotics for you to take (for example, flucloxacillin with phenoxymethylpenicillin (penicillin V) , or co-amoxiclav ). Usually, these antibiotics can be taken by mouth. If the infection is severe, your doctor may suggest that you be admitted to hospital and given antibiotics into your veins (intravenous antibiotics).

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For non-infectious bursitis, the preliminary treatment starts with non-operative options such as cold compression therapy and Blood Flow Stimulation Therapy ™ . Surgery to remove the inflamed bursa is normally not required for bursitis, however if you fail to see improvement with the conservative treatments, your physician may recommend surgery to remove the bursa completely. Although this removes the problem of an inflamed bursa, you are left with less cushioning in your joint which can lead to a host of other conditions.

Regarding diagnosis:

  • Was diagnosis of bursitis confirmed?
  • Does individual have a hobby or a profession that requires repetitive movement or pressure?
  • Does individual have tuberculosis? Rheumatoid arthritis?
  • Did individual have crystal mineral deposits in the bursa from gout or pseudogout?
  • Does individual have a history of taking certain medications, such as corticosteroids and immunosuppressants?
  • Did laboratory examination of synovial fluid aspiration reveal crystals or bacterial infection?
  • Has individual experienced any complications?
Regarding treatment:
  • Did conservative treatment such as rest, ice, elevation, and compression (RICE); immobilization; and pain medication help?
  • Were opioids or oral corticosteroids necessary?
  • Is individual in physical therapy?
  • Was surgery indicated?
  • If bursitis was infectious, were antibiotics given and bursae drained?
Regarding prognosis:
  • Is joint function impaired?
  • Would individual benefit from additional physical therapy to strengthen muscles and re-establish joint's full range of motion?
  • In infectious bursitis, was the area drained until the infectious fluid no longer returned? Could infection still be present?
  • Would individual benefit from additional antibiotic therapy?
  • Were comorbid conditions such as gout, rheumatoid arthritis, or chronic overuse appropriately addressed?
Source: Medical Disability Advisor

Prepatellar bursitis steroid injection

prepatellar bursitis steroid injection

Regarding diagnosis:

  • Was diagnosis of bursitis confirmed?
  • Does individual have a hobby or a profession that requires repetitive movement or pressure?
  • Does individual have tuberculosis? Rheumatoid arthritis?
  • Did individual have crystal mineral deposits in the bursa from gout or pseudogout?
  • Does individual have a history of taking certain medications, such as corticosteroids and immunosuppressants?
  • Did laboratory examination of synovial fluid aspiration reveal crystals or bacterial infection?
  • Has individual experienced any complications?
Regarding treatment:
  • Did conservative treatment such as rest, ice, elevation, and compression (RICE); immobilization; and pain medication help?
  • Were opioids or oral corticosteroids necessary?
  • Is individual in physical therapy?
  • Was surgery indicated?
  • If bursitis was infectious, were antibiotics given and bursae drained?
Regarding prognosis:
  • Is joint function impaired?
  • Would individual benefit from additional physical therapy to strengthen muscles and re-establish joint's full range of motion?
  • In infectious bursitis, was the area drained until the infectious fluid no longer returned? Could infection still be present?
  • Would individual benefit from additional antibiotic therapy?
  • Were comorbid conditions such as gout, rheumatoid arthritis, or chronic overuse appropriately addressed?
Source: Medical Disability Advisor

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